Have any questions? 888.828.4300info@tctmed.com

Have any questions?
888.828.4300info@tctmed.com

Movember and Low T

guywithstache

 

Ever noticed that when November rolls around, your buddies ditch their clean-shaven look and suddenly start sporting proud mustaches? The likelihood is that they are taking part inMovember, a month-long movement that takes place each year to raise awareness of prostate cancer and other male cancers.

Low T and Movember

Having low testosterone does NOT mean that you are at an increased risk of prostate cancer. However, like low testosterone, prostate cancer is a condition that affects many men. Taking part in Movember is a great way to raise awareness for men’s health issues in general, and shows your solidarity with men suffering from male cancers such as prostate cancer. 

Grow Your Mo!

Movember’s slogan is “Changing the face of men’s health”. That is literally what you’ll be doing this November if you choose to get involved. The challenge that Movember lays down – if you choose to accept it – is to grow a mustache (or ‘mo’) as a visual statement of your commitment to improving men’s health. 

How to Get Involved

If you decide to take up the challenge of being a men’s health champion for 30 days, then go to Movember.com and register as a participant. You’ll be able to set up a profile page, where you can post pictures of your mo-growing progress. Share this page with friends, family and colleagues so they can add their donations and messages of support.

If you think that the men in your office would be keen to get involved, you can start a team. Compete against other teams to see who can raise the most money. Some companies also offer gift matching, effectively doubling the value of the team’s fundraising efforts. Companies that donate more than $5,000 through this program will be officially recognized on the Movember website. 

Women are not excluded from Movember. They can register as Mo Sistas to promote men’s health. The Movember Foundation gives resources and advice to Mo Sistas about hosting fundraising events and supporting their Mo Bros as they undergo their hairy adventure. 

Movember History

Movember was started in Melbourne, Australia, by a group of 30 passionate individuals, who decided that the mo’s disappearance was a great loss and wanted to bring it back into style. Their month-long experiment was so successful that the following year they decided to do it again, but this time they brought 450 men on board and persuaded people to sponsor them. The AUD $54,000 raised was donated to the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia. 

By 2006, the word was beginning to spread beyond Australia, with men in New Zealand also getting involved. The very next year, the campaign officially launched in the USA, UK and Spain, spreading awareness to an even wider audience. 

Movember has since grown to become a worldwide phenomenon, with men in Europe, the United States, Singapore and South Africa taking part. More than one million Mo Bros and Mo Sistas registered to take part in 2012, raising a collective total of $147 million to support men’s health programs all around the world. 

The Importance of Men’s Health Awareness


As many low testosterone sufferers know, there is sometimes still a stigma attached to men seeking help with health issues. By taking part in Movember, you can help to break down this barrier and encourage all men to access health care when they need it. You’ll also be helping to fund research into men’s health issues, including prostate and testicular cancer.

symptoms_button

 

SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION

LOW T RESOURCES

Posted in ,

(Augie) Juan Augustine Galindo Jr. MPAS, PA-C

(Augie) Juan Augustine Galindo Jr. MPAS, PA-C started his career in healthcare as a fireman/paramedic in West Texas where he served on the Midland Fire Department from 1998-2004.   He became interested in testosterone treatment after seeing how hormone replacement doctors helped those suffering from low testosterone.   After graduating from the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center Physician Assistant Program, he moved to DFW where he currently lives with his wife and three children.

Leave a Comment